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Joe Leean
Secretary
State of Wisconsin
Department of Public Instruction
December 17, 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
The department is pleased to submit the 1996 Annual Report on the Status of Bilingual-Bicultural Education programs, as required under s. 115.96, Wisconsin Statutes.
The report provides a review of the state's administration and funding of bilingual education in Wisconsin and factors contributing to program expansion and the resulting continuously lower annual reimbursement rates for school districts. The number of pupils served from minority languages, the locations of the state-funded programs during the 1996 fiscal year (July 1, 1995, through June 30, 1996), and staff-related data are included in the report to inform those with responsibilities for ensuring the continued success of bilingual education programs in Wisconsin. I am confident that you will find the report informational, useful and of concern given the rising numbers of pupils to be served absent a corresponding increase in fiscal support by the state.
If you have questions on any aspect of this report, please contact Dr. William J. Erpenbbach, director, equity and Title I, 267-1072. He is willing to discuss these with you at your earliest convenience.
Sincerely,
John T. Benson
State Superintendent
State of Wisconsin
Legislative Audit Bureau
December 18, 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
We have completed a best practices review of local government operations as required by s. 13.94 (8), Wis. Stats. Privatization of local government services was selected as the topic of our review with the assistance of the Local Government Advisory Council, which consists of representatives of counties, cities, villages, and towns.
Nearly 50 percent of the local governments responding to our survey reported that within the past seven years, they have initiated at least one contract for services with a private vendor. Survey respondents most often reported contracts for solid waste collection, recycling, building maintenance building inspections, and road and street repair services.
Local governments commonly consider contracting with private vendors as a way to reduce service costs; however, a careful assessment is necessary to ensure desired benefits will be achieved. In particular, before entering a contract, the full costs of government service delivery must be measured and compared to estimated contracting costs. In addition, service delivery decisions need to take into account whether a delivery system is consistent with the local government's goals and objectives for the service, including quality, control, and long-term stability, as well as the requirements of existing laws and legal obligations.
Based on the contracting experiences of several counties and municipalities, as well as professional and academic literature, this report identifies best practices to follow when contracting for public services. Specific practices are identified for local governments to consider in selecting vendors, specifying service expectations and administrative responsibilities, and establishing monitoring procedures.
We thank the Local Government Advisory Council for its assistance in selecting the topic for our review and we appreciate the courtesy and cooperation extended to us by local government staff.
Sincerely,
Dale Cattanach
State Auditor
State of Wisconsin
State Historical Society of Wisconsin
December 18, 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
I am pleased to send you the second annual report from the Electronic Records Program at the State Historical Society. The State Legislature established the program with a special appropriation in 1994.
S11 The report includes a Preliminary Preservation Plan for statewide electronic records, a Strategic Plan for the Electronic Records Program, and a report on the attempt to take custody of historical data from the Sentencing Commission. Each of these documents identifies issues that must be addressed to ensure the preservation of Wisconsin's historically significant electronic records.
The Preliminary Preservation Plan identifies three primary objectives required to preserve electronic records of historical value. These objectives must be met at a statewide level as well as by each state and local agency.
1. Develop policy and technical standards for electronic recordkeeping.
The state needs policies and technical standards that emphasize the incorporation of record and archives management capabilities into electronic systems, address minimum recordkeeping capabilities, and policies that identify responsibility for long term management of electronic records of permanent value. In areas where the State Archives has authority, it will develop policies and technical standards. Where authority does not exist, the State Archives will actively advocate and participate in the policy and standards development process.
2. Develop a program to assist state agencies and local governments to establish and maintain reliable electronic records.
State and local government employes need an authoritative, reliable, and consistent source of information and training to effectively create, manage, and preserve electronic records. In early 1997, the State Archives will assess program assistance needs and present recommendations for their improvement or development.
3. Develop a model program to manage electronic records of long-term value.
Agencies that have custody of long term records must maintain an archival program capable of meeting archival requirements. Unfortunately, state standards and best practices to meet archival requirements for electronic records do not exist. The State Archives is examining and evaluating archival requirements for managing electronic records and a model archives program to manage electronic records. The outcome of this work will be the development of archival standards and best practices that state and local agencies may adopt.
These three objectives cannot be accomplished without support from all levels of state and local government. Information technology can help Wisconsin state and local agencies do more with less. However, they must also consider the responsibilities that come with creating, using, storing, and preserving electronic records. The state Historical Society and the Electronic Records Program look forward to working with state and local government leaders to ensure that our valuable electronic resources are properly managed.
Please call me at the 264-6480 if you have any questions about our second year report or would like further information on our work.
Sincerely,
Peter Gottlieb
State Archivist
State of Wisconsin
Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Board
December 26, 1996
The Honorable, The Senate:
Enclosed is one copy of the Right From the Start Programs Evaluation Report pursuant to the requirements stated under Wisconsin Statutes, Chapter 48.982, Section 7 (h).
Please feel free to contact me at (608) 266-6871 if you have any questions or need additional information.
Sincerely,
Mary Anne M. Snyder
Acting Executive Director
State of Wisconsin
Council on Physical Disabilities
November 1, 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
As required by s. 46.29 (f) of the state statutes, we are submitting to you the annual report of the Council on Physical Disabilities for fiscal year 1996 (July 1, 1995 through June 30, 1996). the Council appreciates the opportunity to participate in state government as a representative of Wisconsin's citizens with physical disabilities.
Sincerely,
Jackie Stenberg Joel Rodney
1995-96 Chairperson 1996-97 Chairperson
State of Wisconsin
Office of the Commissioner of Insurance
August 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
Pursuant to section 153.10 (10), Wis. Stat., we are pleased to submit to the Governor and to the Legislature the quarterly Health Care Data Report. This report is based on hospital inpatient discharge data reported to the Office of Health Care Information by all operating general medical-surgical and specialty hospitals in Wisconsin for the first quarter of 1995. It also contains selected ambulatory surgery utilization and charge data from general medical-surgical hospitals and freestanding ambulatory surgery centers in Wisconsin during the same quarter.
This report fulfills the statutory requirement to report "in a manner that permits comparisons among hospitals ... the charges for up to 100 health care services or diagnostic-related groups selected by the office."
Sincerely,
Josephine W. Musser
Commissioner of Insurance
Barbara A. Rudolph
Deputy Director
Office of Health Care Information
State of Wisconsin
Office of the Commissioner of Insurance
August 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
Pursuant to section 153.10 (10), Wis. Stat., we are pleased to submit to the Governor and to the Legislature the quarterly Health Care Data Report. This report is based on hospital inpatient discharge data reported to the Office of Health Care Information by all operating general medical-surgical and specialty hospitals in Wisconsin for the second quarter of 1995. It also contains selected ambulatory surgery utilization and charge data from general medical-surgical hospitals and freestanding ambulatory surgery centers in Wisconsin during the same quarter.
S12 This report fulfills the statutory requirement to report "in a manner that permits comparisons among hospitals ... the charges for up to 100 health care services or diagnostic-related groups selected by the office."
Sincerely,
Josephine W. Musser
Commissioner of Insurance
Barbara A. Rudolph
Deputy Director
Office of Health Care Information
State of Wisconsin
Office of the Commissioner of Insurance
September 1996
The Honorable, The Legislature:
Pursuant to section 153.10 (10), Wis. Stat., we are pleased to submit to the Governor and to the Legislature the quarterly Health Care Data Report. This report is based on hospital inpatient discharge data reported to the Office of Health Care Information by all operating general medical-surgical and specialty hospitals in Wisconsin for the third quarter of 1995. It also contains selected ambulatory surgery utilization and charge data from general medical-surgical hospitals and freestanding ambulatory surgery centers in Wisconsin during the same quarter.
This report fulfills the statutory requirement to report "in a manner that permits comparisons among hospitals ... the charges for up to 100 health care services or diagnostic-related groups selected by the office."
Sincerely,
Josephine W. Musser
Commissioner of Insurance
Barbara A. Rudolph
Deputy Director
Office of Health Care Information
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