Tax 11.66(2)(d) (d) Telecommunications message services that consist of recording telecommunications messages and transmitting them to the purchaser of the service or at that purchaser's direction, but not including services that are taxable under par. (a), (b), or (c), or services that are incidental, as defined in s. 77.51 (5), Stats., to another service that is not taxable under subch. III of ch. 77, Stats., and sold to the purchaser of the incidental service. Telecommunications message services include the following:
Tax 11.66(2)(d)1. 1. Nonmechanical telephone answering services.
Tax 11.66 Note Examples: 1) A real estate business, whose employees spend considerable periods of time away from its office, contracts with Company A to answer incoming telephone calls during periods when employees are not available to answer the telephone. Employees of Company A receive the calls to the real estate office by telephone, take messages from incoming callers, and transmit the messages to the real estate company or particular employees in that company. The service provided by Company A is not incidental to another service sold by the company that is not a taxable service. Company A's charge for this service is subject to Wisconsin sales or use tax.
Tax 11.66 Note 2) Company B employs an office management service that provides receptionist, typing, filing, scheduling, bookkeeping, and similar services. Employees of the office management service also answer and route incoming telephone calls. When calls cannot be routed, the office management service takes and transmits messages to the appropriate person. This answering service is only a small part of the total services provided.
Tax 11.66 Note The telephone answering service provided as a part of the office management service is not subject to Wisconsin sales or use tax because it is incidental to the office management service provided and that office management service is not taxable.
Tax 11.66(2)(d)2. 2. Security monitoring services that consist of recording a telecommunications message and notifying the customer or local authorities of the message.
Tax 11.66(2)(d)3. 3. Electronic mail services.
Tax 11.66(2)(d)4. 4. Mechanical or electronic voice messaging and telephone answering services, except ancillary services.
Tax 11.66 Note Example: Company A provides its customers access to an office message system computer through which a customer can deposit or retrieve telephone messages using a touch-tone telephone. The service may be used as a message center, a call forwarding service, or an answering service. Messages are stored in the computer, and the customer may send or retrieve messages, reply to a message directly, reroute messages to others, broadcast messages to a wider group, save selected messages, and cancel messages no longer needed. The service is available 24 hours a day, and the customer accesses the computer through either a toll-free telephone number or a local telephone number. The service provided by Company A is not incidental to another service sold by the company that is not a taxable service and is not associated with or incidental to providing telecommunications services. Company A's charges for this service are subject to Wisconsin sales or use tax.
Tax 11.66(3) (3)Sourcing. This subsection describes the sourcing of telecommunications services, ancillary services, Internet access services, and telecommunications message services.
Tax 11.66(3)(a) (a) Telecommunications services.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)1.1. Except as provided in subds. 3. to 7., the sale of a telecommunications service that is sold on a call-by-call basis is sourced to the taxing jurisdiction:
Tax 11.66(3)(a)1.a. a. where the call originates and terminates, if the call originates and terminates in the same taxing jurisdiction; or
Tax 11.66(3)(a)1.b. b. where the call either originates or terminates and where the service address is located, if the call does not originate and terminate in the same taxing jurisdiction.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)2. 2. Except as provided in subds. 3. to 7., the sale of a telecommunications service that is sold on a basis other than a call-by-call basis is sourced to the customer's place of primary use, as defined in sub. (1) (u).
Tax 11.66(3)(a)3. 3. The sale of a mobile telecommunications service, except an air-to-ground radiotelephone service and a prepaid calling service, is sourced to the customer's place of primary use, as defined in sub. (1) (u).
Tax 11.66(3)(a)4. 4. The sale of a postpaid calling service is sourced to the location where the signal of the telecommunications service originates, as first identified by the seller's telecommunications system or, if the signal is not transmitted by the seller's telecommunications system, by information that the seller received from the seller's service provider.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)5. 5. The sale of a prepaid calling service or a prepaid wireless calling service is sourced to the location determined under s. Tax 11.945 (2).
Tax 11.66(3)(a)6. 6. The sale of a prepaid wireless calling service is sourced to the location determined under s. Tax 11.945 (2), except that if the location cannot be determined under s. Tax 11.945 (2) (a) to (d), the prepaid wireless calling service occurs at the location determined under s. Tax 11.945 (2) (e) 3., or the location associated with the mobile telephone number, as determined by the seller.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)7.a.a. The sale of a private communication service for a separate charge related to a customer channel termination point is sourced to the location of the customer channel termination point.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)7.b. b. The sale of a private communication service in which all customer channel termination points are located entirely in one taxing jurisdiction for sales and use tax purposes is sourced to the taxing jurisdiction in which the customer channel termination points are located.
Tax 11.66 Note Example: Company A contracts with Telecommunications Provider B for private communication service to send data from Company A's bank, located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Company A's automated teller machines or "ATMs," located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and to send data from its ATMs in Milwaukee to its bank in Milwaukee. The charge by Telecommunications Provider B to Company A is based on a certain amount of dedicated channel capacity available to Company A on the communications channel, regardless of the volume of data transmitted or number of transmissions made by Company A. Since all of the customer channel termination points are located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the entire service is sourced to Milwaukee.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)7.c. c. If the segments are charged separately, the sale of a private communication service that represents segments of a communications channel between 2 customer channel termination points that are located in different taxing jurisdictions for sales and use tax purposes is sourced in an equal percentage to both jurisdictions.
Tax 11.66 Note Example: Company B contracts with Telecommunications Provider C for private communication service to send data from Company B's bank, located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Company B's automated teller machine (ATM) located in Waukesha, Wisconsin. Telecommunications Provider C charges Company B based on the location of the segments of the channel termination points. Since Company B has 2 customer channel termination points that are located in different taxing jurisdictions, one located in Milwaukee and the other located in Waukesha, the charge by Telecommunications Provider C to Company B is sourced equally between the Milwaukee taxing jurisdiction and the Waukesha taxing jurisdiction.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)7.d. d. If the segments are not charged separately, the sale of a private communication service for segments of a communications channel that is located in more than one taxing jurisdiction for sales and use tax purposes is sourced to each jurisdiction in a percentage determined by dividing the number of customer channel termination points in that jurisdiction by the number of customer channel termination points in all jurisdictions where segments of the communications channel are located.
Tax 11.66 Note Example: Company JKL, headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has branch offices in Madison, Wisconsin, Green Bay, Wisconsin, Chicago, Illinois and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Company JKL contracts with a telecommunications company for private communication service to send messages between and among its Milwaukee office and the branch offices. Company JKL has exclusive use of the channels while using them. The telecommunications company sells use of the communications channels to other parties while Company JKL is not using them. The charges by the telecommunications company to Company JKL are based on a certain amount of dedicated channel capacity available to Company JKL on the communications channels. The telecommunications company does not bill separately for the segments of the communications channels. Increasing capacity requires a higher charge. The telecommunications company refers to this service as "private line service." Of the charges by the telecommunications company to Company JKL for this service, 60% are subject to Wisconsin sales or use tax because 3 of the 5 customer channel termination points are located in Wisconsin.
Tax 11.66(3)(a)7.e. e. No credit for tax paid to another state is allowed where the other state apportions the service in a manner similar to that provided in subd. 7. c. and d.
Tax 11.66(3)(b) (b) Ancillary services. Except for detailed telecommunications billing services, ancillary services are sourced to the customer's place of primary use, as defined in sub. (1) (u).
Tax 11.66(3)(c) (c) Internet access services. Internet access services are sourced to the customer's place of primary use, as defined in sub. (1) (u).
Tax 11.66(3)(d) (d) Exceptions. For purposes of pars. (a), (b), and (c), if the location of the customer's service address, channel termination point, or place of primary use is not known, the location where the seller receives or hands off the signal shall be considered, for purposes of this rule, the customer's service address, channel termination point, or place of primary use.
Tax 11.66(3)(e) (e) Telecommunications message services. Telecommunications message services are sourced to the location determined under s. Tax 11.945 (2), which will generally result in the sale being sourced to the location where the customer, or someone at the direction of the customer, receives the message.
Tax 11.66(4) (4)Nontaxable services. The sales price from the sale of or charge for the following services are not taxable:
Tax 11.66(4)(a) (a) Interstate or international telecommunications service if the service is sourced to a location outside Wisconsin.
Tax 11.66(4)(b) (b) Revenues collected under s. 256.35 (3), Stats., the surcharge established by the public service commission under s. 256.35 (3m) (f), Stats., for customers of wireless providers as defined in s. 256.35 (3m) (a) 6., Stats., and the police and fire protection fees under s. 196.025 (6), Stats.
Tax 11.66(4)(c) (c) Transfers of telecommunications services to resellers who purchase, repackage and resell the services to customers. The reseller is liable for sales tax on its final retail sales of those services.
Tax 11.66(4)(d) (d) Interstate 800 services.
Tax 11.66(4)(e) (e) Transfers of services, commonly called "access services," to an interexchange carrier which permit the origination or termination of telephone messages between a customer in Wisconsin and one or more points in another telephone exchange, and which are resold by the interexchange carrier. The interexchange carrier is liable for sales tax on its final retail sales of those services.
Tax 11.66(4)(f) (f) Detailed telecommunications billing services, as defined in sub. (1) (h).
Tax 11.66(5) (5)Credit for tax paid to another state. Any person who is subject to the tax under s. 77.52 (2) (a) 5., Stats., on telecommunications services that terminate in Wisconsin and who has paid a similar tax on the same services to another state may reduce the amount of the tax remitted to Wisconsin by an amount equal to the similar tax properly paid to another state on those services or by the amount due Wisconsin on those services, whichever is less. That person shall refund proportionally to the persons to whom the tax under s. 77.52 (2) (a) 5., Stats., was passed on an amount equal to the amounts not remitted.
Tax 11.66(6) (6)Purchases by persons providing service. Persons engaged in the business of providing telecommunications services are consumers, not retailers, of the tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., used by them or transferred incidentally by them in providing those services. The tax applies to the sale of the property, items, or goods to them.
Tax 11.66 Note Note: Section Tax 11.66 interprets ss. 77.51 (1ba), (1r), (3c), (3pe), (3pn), (3rn), (5d), (5f), (5n), (5r), (7k), (8m), (9s), (10d), (10f), (10s), (13rn), (17m), (21n), (24), (25), and (26), 77.52 (2) (a) 5. and 5m., 77.522 (4), and 77.525, Stats.
Tax 11.66 Note Note: The Dane County Circuit Court's decision of May 22, 1981 in Wisconsin Department of Revenue v. North-West Services Corporation and North-West Telephone Company held that a telephone company may purchase without tax tangible personal property leased or rented to customers in conjunction with an activity open to competition with others who are not public utilities.
Tax 11.66 Note Note: The interpretations in s. Tax 11.66 are effective under the general sales and use tax law on or after September 1, 1969, except: (a) Chapter 39, Laws of 1975, effective July 31, 1975, expanded the telephone services subject to the tax to include "telephone services of whatever nature," (b) Chapter 317, Laws of 1981, imposed the tax on interstate telegraph and telephone service, effective May 1, 1982; (c) "911" service became exempt on August 1, 1987, pursuant to 1987 Wis. Act 27; (d) Telecommunications services originating in Wisconsin and charged to a subscriber in Wisconsin became taxable October 1, 1989, pursuant to 1989 Wis. Act 31; (e) Telecommunications services originating in Wisconsin and charged to a service address in Wisconsin became taxable October 1, 1991, pursuant to 1991 Wis. Act 31; (f) The repeal of the exemption for equipment in central offices of telephone companies became effective September 1, 1995, pursuant to 1995 Wis. Act 27; (g) Telecommunications services paid for by the insertion of coins in a coin-operated telephone became taxable August, 1, 1996, pursuant to 1995 Wis. Act 351; (h) Certain telecommunications message services became taxable December 1, 1997, pursuant to 1997 Wis. Act 27; (i) Telecommunications services originating outside Wisconsin, terminating in Wisconsin and charged to a service address in Wisconsin, except certain services obtained by means of a toll-free number, became taxable December 1, 1997, pursuant to 1997 Wis. Act 27; (j) Credit for sales tax properly paid to another state on interstate telecommunications services became effective October 14, 1997, pursuant to 1997 Wis. Act 27; (k) Sales of rights to purchase telecommunications services became taxable August 1, 1998, pursuant to 1997 Wis. Act 237; (L) The exemption for interstate private line services no longer applies, effective December 1, 2002; (m) The definitions of air-to-ground radio telephone service, ancillary services, call-by-call basis, communications channel, conference bridging service, customer, customer channel termination point, detailed telecommunications billing services, directory assistance, eight hundred service, end user, fixed wireless service, home service provider, international telecommunications services, internet access services, interstate telecommunications services, intrastate telecommunications services, mobile telecommunications service, nine hundred service, paging service, place of primary use, postpaid calling service, prepaid calling service, prepaid wireless calling service, private communications service, radio service, radiotelegraph service, radiotelephone service, service address, telecommunications service, value-added nonvoice data service, vertical service, and voice mail service became effective October 1, 2009, pursuant to 2009 Wis. Act 2; (n) The specific imposition of tax on ancillary services and interstate, intrastate, and international telecommunications services became effective October 1, 2009, pursuant to 2009 Wis. Act 2; (o) The sourcing provisions related to telecommunications services became effective October 1, 2009, pursuant to 2009 Wis. Act 2; and (p) The change of the term "gross receipts" to "sales price" and the separate impositions of tax on coins and stamps sold above face value under s. 77.52 (1) (b), Stats., certain leased property affixed to real property under s. 77.52 (1) (c), Stats., and digital goods under s. 77.52 (1) (d), Stats., became effective October 1, 2009, pursuant to 2009 Wis. Act 2.
Tax 11.66 History History: Cr. Register, December, 1977, No. 264, eff. 1-1-78; am. (1) (a), (b), (d) and (e), (2), Register, January, 1983, No. 325, eff. 2-1-83; cr. (1) (f), Register, July, 1987, No. 379, eff. 8-1-87; emerg. r. and recr. (1) (a) and (b), eff. 10-1-89; r. and recr. Register, April, 1990, No. 412, eff. 5-1-90; renum. (3) (d) and (e) to be (4) (f) and (3) (d), Register, March, 1991, No. 423, eff. 4-1-91; r. and recr., Register, September, 1993, No. 453, eff. 10-1-93; am. (2) (intro.) and (5), Register, September, 1997, No. 501, eff. 10-1-97; CR 99-101: r. and recr. (1) (a) and (3), renum. (1) (b), (2), (4) (intro.) to (c), (f), and (5) to be (1) (d), (2) (a), (5) (intro.) to (c), (e) and (8) and am. (2) (a) (intro.), 1., 2. (intro.), (5) (intro.), (a), (c) and (e), cr. (1) (b), (c) and (e), (2) (intro.) and (b), (4), (5) (d), (6) and (7), r. (4) (d) and (e), Register November 2002 No. 563, eff. 12-1-02; EmR0924: emerg. r. and recr. eff. 10-1-09; CR 09-090: r. and recr. Register May 2010 No. 653, eff. 6-1-10; correction in (2) (d) (intro.) made under s. 13.92 (4) (b) 7., Stats., Register May 2010 No. 653; CR 10-094: am. (2) (intro.) Register November 2010 No. 659, eff. 12-1-10; CR 12-014: r. (2) (a) 9., cr. (2) (cm), am. (3) (a) 2., 3., (b), (c) Register August 2012 No. 680, eff. 9-1-12.
Tax 11.67 Tax 11.67 Service enterprises.
Tax 11.67(1) (1) General. When a transaction involves the transfer of tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., along with the performance of a service, and the transaction is neither a bundled transaction, as defined in s. Tax 11.985, nor a transaction to which s. 77.52 (2m) (b), Stats., applies, the true objective of the purchaser shall determine whether the transaction is a sale of tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., or the performance of a service with the transfer of the property, item, or good being incidental to the performance of the service. If the objective of the purchaser is to obtain the personal property, item, or good, a taxable sale of that property, item, or good is involved. However, if the objective of the purchaser is to obtain the service, a sale of a service is involved even though, as an incidence to the service, some tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., may be transferred.
Tax 11.67 Note Example: A person performing business advisory, record keeping, payroll, and tax services for small businesses is providing a service even though this person may provide forms and binders without charge as part of the service. The person is the consumer, not the seller, of tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., furnished as an incidence to the service.
Tax 11.67(2) (2)Receipts and purchases of persons providing services.
Tax 11.67(2)(a)(a) Since persons engaged in the business of furnishing services are consumers, not retailers, of the tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., which they use in rendering their services, tax applies to the sale of the tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., to them.
Tax 11.67 Note Example: Persons engaged in the business of furnishing services include physicians, lawyers and accountants.
Tax 11.67(2)(b) (b) A person who performs a nontaxable service in conjunction with the sale of tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., is a retailer with respect to the sale, and the tax applies to the total sales price from the sale without any deduction for the work, labor, skill, time spent, or other expense of producing the property, item, or good.
Tax 11.67(2)(c)1.1. If there is a single charge for providing both taxable and nontaxable services that are not a bundled transaction as defined in s. 77.51 (1f), Stats., the entire charge is subject to the tax, unless it is determined by the department that another method, such as allocation or primary purpose of the transaction, more accurately reflects the tax. If the charges for taxable and nontaxable services are separately stated on an invoice, the tax applies only to the charge properly attributable to the taxable services, unless it is determined by the department that the primary purpose of the transaction method for computing the tax more accurately reflects the tax.
Tax 11.67(2)(c)2. 2. If there is a single charge for providing both taxable and nontaxable services in a transaction that is a bundled transaction as defined in s. 77.51 (1f), Stats., the entire charge is subject to the tax, except as provided in s. 77.52 (20) (b), Stats.
Tax 11.67(3) (3)Special situations.
Tax 11.67(3)(a)(a) Hospitals and clinics. Hospitals and medical clinics generally provide nontaxable professional services. They are, therefore, the consumers of tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., used in rendering the services. Hospitals and clinics which, in addition to rendering professional services, also sell tangible personal property, items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., or taxable services are retailers and shall obtain a seller's permit and report the tax on these sales.
Tax 11.67 Note Examples: 1) Sales of drugs by a hospital or clinic pharmacy are taxable if they are not dispensed under a prescription.
Tax 11.67 Note 2) Sales of parking for motor vehicles by a hospital or clinic are taxable.
Tax 11.67 Note Note: Refer to s. Tax 11.002 for a description of permit requirements, how to apply for a permit, and the 15-day time period within which the department is required to act on permit applications.
Tax 11.67(3)(b) (b) Original manuscripts or musical arrangements. The transfer to a publisher of an original manuscript or musical arrangement for publication is not a sale of tangible personal property or a digital good under s. 77.52 (1) (d), Stats., and is not subject to the tax. However, the sale of copies of an author's or composer's work is a sale of tangible personal property or a digital good under s. 77.52 (1) (d), Stats., and is taxable. The sale of a manuscript is taxable if the manuscript itself is of particular value as an item of tangible personal property or as a digital good under s. 77.52 (1) (d), Stats., and the purchaser is buying the property or good, and not the service which went into it.
Tax 11.67(3)(c) (c) Artistic expressions. Sales of works of art, such as paintings and sculptures, are taxable.
Tax 11.67(3)(d) (d) Interior designer's fee.
Tax 11.67(3)(d)1.1. An interior designer's fee is taxable when the designer's services are part of a sale of tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats. If a designer bills a client only for the full list price of the property, item, or good sold and then receives the equivalent of a fee through the designer's supplier in the form of a trade discount, the designer shall pay a tax on the full amount billed the client without any deduction for services performed.
Tax 11.67 Note Example: A designer's fee is taxable when it is added to the bill for tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., on a cost-plus arrangement.
Tax 11.67(3)(d)2. 2. A designer's fee is not taxable if the fee is solely for services rendered and there is no sale of tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., involved with the transaction.
Tax 11.67(3)(d)3. 3. If there is a separate charge for the designer's fee in addition to a separate and optional charge for any tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., the designer sells to the client, the designer's fee is not part of the sales price of the tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., if the client had all of the following choices:
Tax 11.67(3)(d)3.a. a. Purchasing the tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., from the designer for an additional, optional, fee.
Tax 11.67(3)(d)3.b. b. Purchasing the tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., from another party.
Tax 11.67(3)(d)3.c. c. Not purchasing the tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats.
Tax 11.67 Note Example: Designing a decorative scheme, advising clients or recommending colors, paints, wallpaper, fabrics, brands, or sources of supply are nontaxable services.
Tax 11.67(3)(e) (e) Research and development.
Tax 11.67(3)(e)1.1. The development of information pursuant to a research and development contract is a sale of a service which is not subject to the sales tax. Although the person performing the research and development may be under contract to provide plans, designs, and specifications, or to test and evaluate a proposed product, the primary objective of the customer is to obtain the results of the technical skill and the experimental and research work of the engineers and other technicians of the researcher.
Tax 11.67(3)(e)2. 2. In certain instances under a research and development contract, the information cannot be developed without the production of a prototype. In this situation, if the primary objective of the customer in the transaction is to obtain tangible personal property or an item under s. 77.52 (1) (b), Stats., such as a prototype, the researcher may purchase the material used to construct the prototype without tax as property for resale. The subsequent sale of the prototype by the researcher to the customer is subject to tax unless an exemption applies. If the primary objective of the customer is to obtain the information resulting from production of the prototype, the prototype is considered transferred to the customer incidental to the research and development services. The researcher is subject to tax on the material purchased and used to construct the prototype. Determinations shall be made on a case-by-case basis.
Tax 11.67 Note Note: For a ruling on whether a specific transaction is a sale of a prototype or a research and development service with the prototype transferred incidental to the research and development service, write to Wisconsin Department of Revenue, Administration Technical Services, P.O. Box 8933, Madison, WI 53708-8933. The transaction should be described in detail.
Tax 11.67(3)(f) (f) Recording studios. When a recording studio agrees to furnish or supply records, acetates, compact discs, or other tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats., which becomes the property, item, or good of others, the tax applies to the total sales price resulting from the sale of the tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats. The sales price may not be reduced for labor or service costs, including charges for the use or rental of studio facilities, even though those costs may be itemized in billing the customer.
Tax 11.67(3)(g) (g) Architects. Fees paid to architects, except fees paid to architects for landscaping planning, to design buildings or structures are for services performed, and are not subject to the tax. If, however, an architect has blueprints made from original drawings, the sale of the blueprints is subject to the tax.
Tax 11.67(3)(h) (h) Drafting. Charges made by a self-employed person for commercial drafting are subject to the tax when the charge is for detailed drawings based entirely on specifications and data supplied by architects, engineers, or other business firms. These charges are taxable if the concepts, ideas, specifications, or designs depicted in the drawings produced are the customer's and the person performing the drafting simply transfers the details supplied by the customer to paper thereby producing a drawing, which is tangible personal property, for use by the customer. It would also be taxable if it is transferred electronically to the purchaser since it is an additional digital good. When the person performing drafting services uses his or her own concepts and ideas in producing detailed drawings for a customer, the sale of the drawings is not a sale of tangible personal property or items, property, or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), or (d), Stats.
Tax 11.67(3)(i) (i) Enuresis alarms. Charges for rental of bed-wetting alarm systems are taxable charges for the use of tangible personal property, not charges for a service, whether or not the lessor analyzes information about the user and completes a report based on the information.
Tax 11.67(3)(j) (j) Detonating explosives. Detonating explosives is a non-taxable service. A person who performs that service and furnishes the explosives used in conjunction with the service is the consumer of the explosives.
Tax 11.67(3)(k) (k) Taxidermists. The sales price from services taxidermists perform on tangible personal property is subject to the tax.
Tax 11.67(3)(L) (L) Car washes. The sales price received by persons providing car wash services, including those providing coin-operated self-service car washes consisting of a pressurized spray of soap and water, are taxable. These persons are the consumers of the tangible personal property such as soap, brushes, and towels they purchase, except for the wax, air freshener, and protectants physically transferred to a customer's vehicle. Thus, suppliers may accept an exemption certificate claiming resale for the wax, air freshener, protectants, and other tangible personal property and items, property, and goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b), (c), and (d), Stats., sold to car wash operators, which will be physically transferred to the car wash operator's customers. Car wash operators are liable for sales or use tax on their purchases of supplies that they use in providing their services unless those items are physically transferred to their customers.
Tax 11.67(3)(m) (m) Soliciting advertising for telephone directories. Persons who solicit advertising for telephone books and who, as an incident of the service, provide telephone books to telephone companies or their subscribers, are the consumers of and shall pay tax on all the telephone books they distribute in Wisconsin.
Tax 11.67 Note Example: Company B located in Wisconsin solicits advertising for telephone books yellow pages and compiles, publishes, and delivers the directories to the subscribers of telephone companies. Company B contracts with an out-of-state corporation to print the directories. The printer delivers a portion of the directories to the U.S. Postal Service for delivery directly to telephone subscribers in Wisconsin. The remaining directories are delivered to Company B who in turn distributes them to subscribers in Wisconsin. Company B is subject to use tax on the directories delivered by the U.S. Postal Service as well as on the directories which it distributes to subscribers.
Tax 11.67 Note Note: Section Tax 11.67 interprets ss. 77.51 (1f), (12), (12m), (13), (14) (intro.) and (h), (15a), (15b), (20), and (22) (a) and (b) and 77.52 (1), (2) (a), (2m) (a) and (b), and (20), Stats.
Tax 11.67 Note Note: The interpretations in s. Tax 11.67 are effective under the general sales and use tax law on and after September 1, 1969, except that (a) The fees paid to architects performing landscaping planning became taxable effective May 1, 1982, pursuant to Chapter 317, Laws of 1981; (b) The definition of bundled transactions became effective October 1, 2009, pursuant to 2009 Wis. Act 2; and (c) The change of the term "gross receipts" to "sales price" and the separate impositions of tax on coins and stamps sold above face value under s. 77.52 (1) (b), Stats., certain leased property affixed to real property under s. 77.52 (1) (c), Stats., and digital goods under s. 77.52 (1) (d), Stats., became effective October 1, 2009, pursuant to 2009 Wis. Act 2.
Tax 11.67 History History: Cr. Register, January, 1978, No. 265, eff. 2-1-78; am. (3) (n), Register, June, 1983, No. 330, eff. 7-1-83; r. (3) (k) and am. (3) (n), Register, September, 1984, No. 345, eff. 10-1-84; am. (3) (h), Register, April 1990, No. 412, eff. 5-1-90; am. (1), (2) (b) and (c), (3) (a), (d) 1. and 2., (e) 1. and 2., (g), (L), (m) and (n), Register, November, 1993, No. 455, eff. 12-1-93; am. (2) (a), (3) (e) 2., (f), (h) and (j), r. (3) (e) 3., renum. (3) (L) to (n) to be (3) (k) to (m) and am. (3) (L), Register, April, 2000, No. 532, eff. 5-1-00; EmR0924: emerg. am. (1), (2) (a), (b), (3) (a), (b), (d), (e), (f), (h), (i), (k) and (L), renum. (2) (c) to be (2) (c) 1. and am., cr. (2) (c) 2., eff. 10-1-09; CR 09-090: am. (1), (2) (a), (b), (3) (a), (b), (d), (e), (f), (h), (i), (k) and (L), renum. (2) (c) to be (2) (c) 1. and am., cr. (2) (c) 2. Register May 2010 No. 653, eff. 6-1-10; CR 10-094: am. (1), (2) (b), (3) (d) (title), 1., 2., cr. (3) (d) 3. Register November No. 659, eff. 12-1-10; correction in (1) made under s. 13.92 (4) (b) 7., Stats., Register November 2010 No. 659.
Tax 11.68 Tax 11.68 Construction contractors.
Tax 11.68(1) (1) Definition. In this section, "real property construction activities" means activities that occur at a site where tangible personal property or items or goods under s. 77.52 (1) (b) or (d), Stats., that are applied or adapted to the use or purpose to which real property is devoted are affixed to that real property, if the intent of the person who affixes that property, item, or good is to make a permanent accession to the real property. "Real property construction activities" do not include affixing property subject to tax under s. 77.52 (1) (c), Stats., to real property or affixing to real property tangible personal property that remains tangible personal property after it is affixed.
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