NR 1.213(3) (3) The department may enter into cooperative agreements with foresters, including all persons identified as a consulting forester on the department's consulting foresters list as of February 1, 1989, and maintain a listing of cooperating consulting foresters and industrial foresters or forestry firms available to provide forestry services to private landowners. The cooperative agreements shall provide that:
NR 1.213(3)(a) (a) The department shall establish a cooperative program of referrals of landowner requests for forestry assistance which will utilize cooperating foresters to provide private forestry assistance.
NR 1.213(3)(b) (b) The cooperating forester shall manage private lands where the cooperator provides service in a manner which maintains the long-term capacity of the land to provide forest products, uses and values desired by landowners in accordance with the silvicultural guidelines in department handbooks and directives or a written, science-based forest management commitment submitted to and approved by the department in advance.
NR 1.213 Note Note: This section does not apply to land use conversions, such as the change of forestland to agricultural use. Land use conversions are not considered to be forest management.
NR 1.213(3)(c) (c) The cooperating forester shall use accepted methods that recognize the landowner's personal land management objectives.
NR 1.213(3)(d) (d) The cooperating forester shall attend a minimum of 10 hours of department–approved training annually.
NR 1.213(3)(e) (e) The cooperating forester agrees to submit to the department reports of timber sale stumpage volumes and values for sales he or she administers.
NR 1.213(3)(f) (f) Any other provisions deemed reasonable by the department to further the practice of sound forestry in the state.
NR 1.213 History History: Cr. Register, July, 1989, No. 403, eff. 8-1-89; am. (1) and (3) (intro.) to (e), Register, February, 1996, No. 482, eff. 3-1-96; CR 01-030: am. (3) (b) and (d), Register November 2001 No. 551, eff. 12-1-01.
NR 1.22 NR 1.22Establishment of coniferous plantations. The department shall encourage the establishment and intensive management of coniferous plantations planted with suitable species and spacing. The landowner shall be encouraged to maintain access ways which will aid in the management, diversified use, prevention, detection and suppression of destructive forces which might endanger such plantations
NR 1.22 History History: Cr. Register, April, 1975, No. 232, eff. 5-1-75.
NR 1.23 NR 1.23Fire control cooperation. The department shall assist local governments in fire emergencies whenever possible, utilizing personnel and equipment from the department.
NR 1.23 History History: Cr. Register, April, 1975, No. 232, eff. 5-1-75.
NR 1.24 NR 1.24Management of state and county forests.
NR 1.24(1)(1) The natural resources board's objective for the management of state forests and other department properties where timber cutting is carried out and county forests is to grow forest crops by using silvicultural methods that will perpetuate the forest and maintain diversified plant and animal communities, protect soil, watersheds, streams, lakes, shorelines and wetlands, in a true multiple-use concept. In the management of the forests, it shall be the goal of the board to insure stability in incomes and jobs for wood producers in the communities in which the state and county forest lands are located, and to increase employment opportunities for wood producers in future years. Whenever possible, large sale contracts shall be for 4 years which will assist wood producers in dealing with uneven demand and prices for their products.
NR 1.24(2) (2) To achieve this objective, sale areas or cutting blocks and timber harvest operations will be planned through an intra-departmental inter-disciplinary review process when 10-year plans are developed in cooperation with the affected county to optimize management practices; to recognize the long-term values of preserving the integrity of the soil; to assure the maintenance of water quality; and to achieve multiple objectives of forest land management. Although multiple use shall be the guiding principle on state and county forests, the board recognizes that optimization of each use will not be possible on every acre. Desirable practices include:
NR 1.24(2)(a) (a) Fully utilizing available topographic maps, aerial photographs and soil surveys and combining these with local knowledge or field reconnaissance to ascertain on-the-ground conditions.
NR 1.24(2)(b) (b) Wherever practical, use perennial streams as harvest-cutting boundaries with provision for a streamside management zone to protect stream bank integrity and water quality, and with skidding planned away from these streams and the adjacent streamside management zones.
NR 1.24(2)(c) (c) An appropriate silvicultural system and cutting design should be planned to optimize economic skidding distances, to minimize road densities and unnecessary road construction and for efficient establishment and management of subsequent forest crops.
NR 1.24(2)(d) (d) Cutting boundaries should utilize topographic terrain, ridges, roads and forest type changes where ownership patterns permit and should provide a harvest area size consistent with economical skidding, available logging equipment, silvicultural requirements and other management objectives.
NR 1.24(2)(e) (e) Plan cutting layouts to avoid leaving narrow unmanageable strips of timber susceptible to storm damage and windthrow.
NR 1.24(3) (3) Department properties and county forests shall be zoned and managed primarily for aesthetic values in selected areas as identified in the master plan to recognize the importance of scenic values to the economy of the state. When clearcutting can be used to develop specialized habitat conditions within the forest, i.e., savanna type openings for sharp tail grouse management or is the appropriate silvicultural system, due consideration shall be given to the attainment of biological diversity of the future forest, the development of edge for wildlife, a variety of age classes in future growth and aesthetic quality of the area. Clearcutting is a silvicultural system usually applicable to intolerant species and is defined for purposes of this policy as a timber removal practice that results in a residual stand of less than 30 feet of basal area per acre upon completion of a timber sale. Furthermore, as the existing acreage of overmature even-aged stands change, the long-range goal of the board shall be to increase the intensities of professional management on the state and county forests.
NR 1.24(4) (4) Special management practices shall apply to eagle and osprey nesting sites, deer yards, to lake and stream shoreline zones, to sensitive soil types, to springs and important watersheds, to selected aesthetically managed roadsides and to land use zones identified in the master plan as managed more restrictive.
NR 1.24(5) (5) Block type plantings of a single species that create a monotype culture within an area shall be discouraged. Plantations shall be established to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing appearance and to provide for added diversity of type. Planting will be accomplished by varying the direction of the rows or contouring to create a more natural appearance, planting on the contour, using shallow furrows or eliminating furrows where practical. In planting adjacent to a major roadway, the first rows should be parallel to the roadway to meet aesthetic concern and provide game cover. Existing and new plantations will be thinned at the earliest opportunity and periodically thereafter to develop an understory for wildlife habitat and a more natural environment.
NR 1.24 History History: Cr. Register, December, 1977, No. 264, eff. 1-1-78.
NR 1.25 NR 1.25Generally accepted forestry management practices.
NR 1.25(1)(1)Purpose. Section 823.075 (1) (d), Stats., requires the department to define generally accepted forestry management practices.
NR 1.25(2) (2)Definitions. In this section:
NR 1.25(2)(a) (a) “Department" means the Wisconsin department of natural resources.
NR 1.25(2)(b) (b) “Generally accepted forestry management practices" means forestry management practices that promote sound management of a forest. “Generally accepted forestry management practices" include those practices contained in the most recent version of the department publication known as Wisconsin Forest Management Guidelines and identified as PUB FR-226.
NR 1.25(2)(c) (c) “Sound management of a forest" means sustainably managing a forest with the application of ecological, physical, quantitative, managerial, economic, and social principles to the regeneration, management, utilization, protection and conservation of forest ecosystems to meet specified wildlife habitat, watershed, aesthetics, cultural and biological goals and objectives while maintaining the productivity of the forest.
NR 1.25(3) (3)Department duties.
NR 1.25(3)(a)(a) The department-developed Wisconsin Forest Management Guidelines, PUB FR-226, shall contain forestry management practices that are recommended and approved by the department to promote sound management of a forest.
NR 1.25 Note Note: Copies of Wisconsin Forest Management Guidelines, PUB FR-226, are available for inspection at the offices of the Department of Natural Resources and the Legislative Reference Bureau. Copies may be obtained from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry, 101 S. Webster Street, P.O. Box 7921, Madison, WI, 53707-7921. Property owners may seek advice on implementation of generally accepted forestry management practices from department foresters, county foresters and cooperating foresters.
NR 1.25(3)(b) (b) The department shall periodically update Wisconsin Forest Management Guidelines so that a person may readily determine what forestry management practices are recommended and approved by the department. The department shall update Wisconsin Forest Management Guidelines a minimum of every 5 years.
NR 1.25(3)(c) (c) The department shall use a process that incorporates public participation and public comments when updating Wisconsin Forest Management Guidelines.
NR 1.25 History History: CR 06-097: cr. Register April 2007 No. 616, eff. 5-1-07.
NR 1.26 NR 1.26Contracting with cooperating foresters for timber sale establishment.
NR 1.26(1) (1)Purpose. The department may contract with private cooperating foresters to assist the state in the harvesting and sale of timber from state forest lands to meet the annual allowable timber harvest established under s. 28.025, Stats.
NR 1.26(2) (2)Definition. “Cooperating forester" has the meaning given in s. NR 1.21 (2) (b).
NR 1.26(3) (3)Contracted tasks. Tasks included in cooperating forester contracts for state land timber harvests may include updating of forest reconnaissance, marking of trees and harvest boundaries, estimating volume, preparing maps, recommending timber sale contract terms or operational specifications, providing data on cutting notices and reports, scaling cut products, and inspecting active harvests. The department shall determine which of these services are appropriate to contract for on individual timber sales.
NR 1.26(4) (4)Department tasks. The department shall select areas to harvest, determine silvicultural harvest systems to be applied, and define any additional timber sale procedures or precautions necessary to achieve objectives in approved master plans or other department policies. The department shall review and approve cutting notices and reports, prepare contracts, advertise for timber sale bids, award sales, receive stumpage payments and performance bonds, and administer timber sale contracts. The department shall monitor the performance of cooperating foresters contracting on state forest timber harvests for quality of service and conformance to department standards.
NR 1.26(5) (5)Bids for services and payments to cooperating foresters. Cooperating foresters shall be compensated at the department's choice of a rate per hour, acre or project established by bids. When a need for timber sale assistance is identified, the department shall issue a request for bids to cooperating foresters serving the area. Bids shall include labor, travel, equipment and any supplies such as marking paint not identified as being provided by the department that a contractor would need to do the work. Timber sale assistance contract awards shall be determined on price alone unless additional evaluation criteria such as specialized training or experience are included in the request for bids.
NR 1.26(6) (6)Method to allot timber sale revenue. As provided in s. 28.05, Stats., payments to cooperating foresters for timber harvesting and selling assistance on state-owned land shall be paid from an allocation of timber sale proceeds. The department of natural resources shall make periodic requests to the department of administration for allocations of funding to the cooperating foresters appropriation, s. 20.370 (2) (cy), Stats. The size of the requested allocation shall be based on outstanding purchase requisitions for the contracted timber harvest assistance. The appropriation shall be split-funded with the proportionate splits coming from the administrative function accounts where the timber sale revenues are deposited.
NR 1.26 History History: CR 07-011: cr. Register October 2007 No. 622, eff. 11-1-07; correction in (6) made under s. 13.92 (4) (b) 7., Stats., Register November 2018 No. 755.
NR 1.27 NR 1.27Contracting with cooperating foresters and private contractors for regeneration services.
NR 1.27(1) (1)Purpose. The department may contract with private cooperating foresters and private contractors to assist the state in the regeneration of state forest lands to meet the annual allowable timber harvest established under s. 28.025, Stats.
NR 1.27(2) (2)Definition. “Cooperating forester" has the meaning given in s. NR 1.21 (2) (b).
NR 1.27(3) (3)Contracted tasks. Tasks included in contracts with cooperating foresters and private contractors for state lands regeneration services may include, site preparation, invasive species control, and tree planting on harvested lands. The department shall determine which of these services are appropriate to contract for on individual timber sales.
NR 1.27(4) (4)Department tasks. The department shall select areas to regenerate, determine regeneration systems to be applied, and define any additional procedures or precautions necessary to achieve objectives in approved master plans or other department policies. The department shall monitor the performance of cooperating foresters and private contractors contracting on state forest lands for quality of service and conformance to department standards.
NR 1.27(5) (5)Bids for services and payments to cooperating foresters and private contractors. Cooperating foresters and private contractors shall be compensated at the department's choice of a rate per hour, acre or project established by bids for individual projects. When a need for regeneration project assistance is identified, the department shall issue a project-specific request for bids to cooperating foresters and private contractors that are experienced in the desired type of work. The department may establish pre-qualification lists of cooperating foresters and private contractors serving an area. Bids may include labor, travel, equipment and any supplies not identified as being provided by the department that a private contractor would need to do the work. As provided in s. 28.05 (3) (am), Stats., payments to cooperating foresters and private contractors for regeneration assistance on state-owned lands shall be paid from an appropriation of timber sale proceeds.
NR 1.27 History History: CR 13-023: cr. Register December 2013 No. 696, eff. 1-1-14.
NR 1.29 NR 1.29Ice Age and North Country trails.
NR 1.29(1) (1)Footpaths. The Ice Age Trail and North Country Trail shall be managed primarily as footpaths for pedestrian use: walking, hiking, backpacking, snowshoeing, and ungroomed cross-country skiing.
NR 1.29(2) (2)Purpose.
NR 1.29(2)(a)(a) The purpose of the Ice Age Trail is to provide premier hiking and backpacking experiences and to preserve and interpret Wisconsin's glacial landscape and other natural and cultural resources in areas through which the trail passes.
NR 1.29(2)(b) (b) The purpose of the North Country Trail is to provide premier hiking and backpacking experiences as it meanders through a variety of northern landscapes, linking scenic, natural, historic, and cultural areas in seven states from New York to North Dakota.
NR 1.29(3) (3)Definitions. In this section:
NR 1.29(3)(a) (a) “Dispersed camping area" has the meaning given in s. NR 45.03 (9c).
NR 1.29(3)(b) (b) “Ice Age Trail" has the meaning given in s. 23.17 (2), Stats. When the Ice Age Trail is within a property other than a State Ice Age Trail Area, the Ice Age Trail for management purposes shall be the treadway, which is the trail tread and the land 25 feet adjacent to both sides of the trail tread.
NR 1.29(3)(c) (c) “Master plan" has the meaning given in s. NR 44.03 (8).
NR 1.29(3)(d) (d) “State Ice Age Trail Areas" mean lands purchased by the department for the Ice Age Trail under the authority of s. 23.09 (2) (d) 10., Stats., except when purchased as part of another department project.
NR 1.29(4) (4)Dispersed Camping And Trail Construction. On State Ice Age Trail Areas and on lands purchased for the North Country Trail, construction of the Ice Age and North Country trails and dispersed camping areas are authorized prior to the approval of a master plan for the property as allowed by department criteria and approval processes.
NR 1.29(5) (5)Vehicles.
NR 1.29(5)(a)(a) Vehicles shall be prohibited on the Ice Age trail except as provided for in s. NR 45.14 (1), which shall also apply to this section, and except for snowmobiles where deemed appropriate by the secretary of the department of the interior and the managing authority responsible for the segment as permitted by 16 U.S.C. 1241.
NR 1.29(5)(b) (b) Vehicles shall be prohibited on the North Country Trail except as provided for in s. NR 45.14 (1), which shall also apply to this section.
NR 1.29(6) (6)State Ice Age Trail Areas — Purpose. Ice Age Trail Areas permanently protect lands to provide for segments of the Ice Age Trail; preserve Wisconsin's glacial landscape features and other natural and cultural resources associated with the trail route; and, where possible, offer a primitive atmosphere of relative solitude and perceived remoteness where visitors may experience a quiet connection with nature. In suburban areas or other developed areas, and on smaller parcels of land, not all of the Ice Age Trail Area purposes may be realized; however, they shall be maximized to the degree practicable at the site.
NR 1.29(7) (7)State Ice Age Trail Areas — Recreational Use And Management.
NR 1.29(7)(a)(a) Objectives. The purpose of the Ice Age Trail as provided in sub. (2) (a), and further defined by the Ice Age Trail Vision Statement and Attributes, shall receive primary consideration in the master planning for State Ice Age Trail Areas. All uses included in sub. (1) and sub. (2) (a), and facilities that directly support these uses shall be allowed. Compatible, non-Ice Age Trail related objectives may be accommodated; however, they may be limited in scope of time and location to avoid interference with primary Ice Age Trail purpose.
NR 1.29 Note Note: Note: The Vision Statement and Attributes is part of the Memorandum of Understanding between the National Park Service, Ice Age Trail Alliance (née Ice Age Park and Trail Foundation), and the department concerning the Ice Age Trail.
NR 1.29(7)(b) (b) Allowable non-Ice Age Trail related recreational uses and facility development.
NR 1.29(7)(b)1.1. To determine the suitability of secondary uses as listed in subds. 2. to 4. on a State Ice Age Trail Area, the specific characteristics of each Ice Age Trail Area, including the size, topography, vegetation, and sustainability, shall be considered. Conditions specific to funding sources used for the property shall also be upheld.
NR 1.29(7)(b)2. 2. Depending on conditions including topography and sight lines, bicycling and horse riding may take place on a State Ice Age Trail Area. Location of these trails shall not detract from the purpose of the property as provided in sub. (6). In general, such use shall take place not less than 200 - 500 feet away from the Ice Age Trail tread.
NR 1.29(7)(b)3. 3. Snowmobile, and ATV and similar motorized recreational use may be established if conditions including topography and sight lines allow the use to exist without detracting from the purpose of the property as provided in sub. (6), provided that use is more than ¼ mile from Ice Age Trail tread, and if the solitude and quiet experience of the Ice Age Trail user is not compromised by that use.
NR 1.29(7)(b)4. 4. Intersections of motorized trails and the Ice Age Trail may not be allowed, except as provided in sub. (5). Intersections of non-motorized, non-hiking trails and the Ice Age Trail are avoided; exceptions may be allowed on a case-by-case basis when necessary to accommodate or maintain a larger, regional trail system.
NR 1.29(7)(b)5. 5. Hunting as authorized pursuant to s. 29.089, Stats., and natural resources board determinations under s. 29.089 (1m), Stats.
NR 1.29(7)(b)6. 6. No coincident use of the Ice Age Trail tread may be allowed for any uses other than those primary uses listed in sub. (1) and sub. (2) (a).
NR 1.29(7)(c) (c) Vegetation Management. The desired future vegetation condition is natural communities composed of native plants and animals. Prescriptive management plans shall be designed to meet the goals of the desired future condition. When developing the vegetation management component of the property master plan, the specific characteristics of each State Ice Age Trail Area shall be considered, including the pre-settlement vegetation, soil types, and feasibility of the department and its partners to maintain the ecosystem.
NR 1.29(7)(d) (d) Pre-master plan. Prior to the approval of the property master plan, management activities and uses on State Ice Age Trail Areas shall be limited to the following:
NR 1.29(7)(d)1. 1. `Recreational Use and Facility Development.'
NR 1.29(7)(d)1.a.a. All uses and activities allowed in subs. (1) and (4).
NR 1.29(7)(d)1.b. b. Pre-existing crossings of the Ice Age Trail by designated state or county trails.
NR 1.29(7)(d)1.c. c. Hunting in accordance with s. NR 10.275 (4) and s. NR 45.09 (11).
NR 1.29 Note Note: Section NR 10.275 (4) was repealed by CR 13-108 Register August 2014 No 704, eff. 9-1-14. Section NR 45.09 (11) was repealed by CR 16-001 Register No. 739, eff. 8-1-17.
NR 1.29(7)(d)1.d. d. Motorized vehicles use as described in sub. (5).
NR 1.29(7)(d)1.e. e. Small, lightly developed parking areas, such as a gravel parking lot, may be constructed.
NR 1.29(7)(d)1.f. f. Signage may be installed for marking the Ice Age Trail; regulatory uses; property management, including boundaries; and general property or Ice Age Trail information, such as a kiosk.
NR 1.29(7)(d)2. 2. `Vegetation Management.' Native community types existing at the time of acquisition shall be retained or enhanced.
NR 1.29(7)(d)2.a. a. Vegetative management shall focus on enhancing the scenic and natural values along the Ice Age Trail. Cropped lands may be planted with a permanent grass cover. Tree plantations may be thinned to create a more natural appearing condition.
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Published under s. 35.93, Stats. Updated on the first day of each month. Entire code is always current. The Register date on each page is the date the chapter was last published.